LLog – 20170217

Reviewed my projects and learning goals.  I have felt myself slipping into ‘randomness’ again as far as my study and project management.  I am planning a blog to explain things in more detail but essentially I’m going to approach my projects the same way as exercise – identify primary and secondary elements then rotate through them in a specific order with primary followed by secondary. However if I can’t get to a secondary project in a given day then it falls back into the queue so that the day always begins with work on a primary project.

I’m also going to make a quick note here of what I worked on as a reference.

Worked on AI course last night.  Ended up reviewing the term ‘recursive’ which naturally led to iteration using Python examples.  That led to reading about binomial coefficients, Fibonacci numbers, and Pascal’s Pyramid.

Then secondary study of Castles and Crusaders books and some notes to prepare for playing next week when the kids are off.

Bruce Meets Maria – Artificial Intelligence in the ICU

It was a moment he would live thousands of times, played out slowly, some details emerging, others fading.  There is always the music playing softly as he reads the daily news feed on his tablet, relaxing comfortably with part of his attention on the smooth motion of his vehicle, that sense of enjoyment he got from those few times of constant motion in his commute.  And then a fog seems to fall across the scene.  He is outside of himself, watching, sitting there, a half smile at some humorous post and then a sudden figure appearing in the right window, a vehicle moving much too fast, much too close, something he hadn’t even thought possible in this age of Autonomous Driving Vehicles… Continue reading “Bruce Meets Maria – Artificial Intelligence in the ICU”

LLog – 20170121

For example, in two-dimensional space, we have vectors such as x = (3, 4) and y = (0, 2) .

I am just starting an EDx course on Artificial Intelligence  and I just read this in the recommended book, Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach,  in the math appendix and I realized it is a key-value pair, and or a tuple (I am thinking in Python terms though I think this is broadly applied to many languages)

So is this why a dictionary is hashable? It can be represented in such a way that every part is in relation to every other so if you know a few parts you can abstract or build the rest?

In other words, iterating through a dictionary takes the same amount of time no matter the size but not so with a list. In python. In some languages there is no distinction between a list and dictionary.

Here is an interesting site that describes the concepts in addition to the book.