LLog – 20170121

For example, in two-dimensional space, we have vectors such as x = (3, 4) and y = (0, 2) .

I am just starting an EDx course on Artificial Intelligence  and I just read this in the recommended book, Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach,  in the math appendix and I realized it is a key-value pair, and or a tuple (I am thinking in Python terms though I think this is broadly applied to many languages)

So is this why a dictionary is hashable? It can be represented in such a way that every part is in relation to every other so if you know a few parts you can abstract or build the rest?

In other words, iterating through a dictionary takes the same amount of time no matter the size but not so with a list. In python. In some languages there is no distinction between a list and dictionary.

Here is an interesting site that describes the concepts in addition to the book.

LLog – 20170114

I have been thinking about the algebra problem I helped my 14 yo with.  Thinking in a ‘meta’ over principle context, Algebra right now, in these beginning stages,  is about learning to recognize a problem and name or categorize it (polynomial, etc) and know what algorithm to apply to it – and in the next levels to take a problem and break it down into something that a familiar algorithm can be applied to – break it down into something that can be named or categorized and that a known algorithm can be applied to.

Programming is essentially the same.  Framing a problem in such a way and breaking it down into pieces that can then be coded.